Serial interface boards (RS 422/485/232)

A serial data transfer is normally used when data has to be sent over a distance of more than 10 meters. In contrast to the parallel interface, the data is sent bit by bit (serial). Additionaly, start, stop and parity bits are inserted into the data stream. While the parallel interface uses eight wires plus control wires, the serial only needs two. To guarantee a safe and error-free transfer in all circumstances, standards were defined.

 
USB  
 
    interface(s) software
bus number type speed IRQ compatibility Win2000 / Win98
               
USB-RS232USB   RS-232 max 230 kbps     yes
Optically protected RS232 Port
No external power supply nescessary
High transfer rate ( high-speed optocoupler )
All In- and outputs protected against short circuit
Contains Windows XP / 2000 / WIN9x / ME drivers
Contains shielded USB cable ( length 1,8 metres )
Plug & Play compatible
USB-Cable in scope of supply  More info...

               
USB-RS422/485/LCUSB 1 RS-422/485 max 115.2 KBaud IRQ sharing   yes
USB 1.1 Interface with one RS-422/485 port with 16KV surge protection
No conflicts with IRQ and I/O adresses
AC power through USB-Bus
Supports environments with 4 lines RS-422/485 and 2 lines RS-485  More info...

               
USBSER4USB 4 RS-232 max 115.2 KBaud IRQ sharing   yes
USB 1.1 Interface with four RS232 ports
Easy installation through Hot Plug and Play support
No conflicts with IRQ and I/O adresses
Drivers for Windows 98 / 98SE / 2000 / ME / XP and MAC OS 9.x,10.1.x  More info...

               
USBSER8USB 8 RS-232 max 115.2 KBaud IRQ sharing   yes
USB 1.1 Interface with eight RS232 ports
Easy installation through Hot Plug and Play support
No conflicts with IRQ and I/O adresses
Drivers for Windows 98 / 98SE / 2000 / ME / XP / Server 2003 and MAC OS 9.x,10.1.x  More info...

               
USB-TTYUSB 1 TTY max. 57,6 kbps     yes
USB interface (virtual COM haven)
Isolation 500 VDC 1 min.
TTY isolated over optocouplers
Integrated FIFO for RX and TX
Baud rate 300 bps... 57,6 kbps
USB self powered (4 loads)
USB com drivers for Win9x/ME/2000/XP
Included protected USB cable 1.8 m
Support 20 mA loop communication   More info...


Glossary:

RS-232
This interface standard is designed for two communication devices which each use a data source and a data sink. For data transfer, three wires are needed, a send wire (TX), a receive wire (RX) and a common ground.
The signals of RS-232 are bipolar. A logical ‘0’ is represented by a voltage of +12 Volt, a logical ‘1’ by -12 V. The ratio of signals and disturbance is therefore significantly bigger than on a parallel interface. This makes it possible to transfer data over relatively long distances without bigger disturbance.
Cable lengths of more than 20 meters are not recommended.
double-current, also named TTY
This transfer type uses a wire with impressed current (20 mA). Therefore, the voltage loss does not influence the transfer that much so that cable lengths of up to 100 meters can be used.
The data signal is transfered in push-pull operations (like the RS-422), which significantly reduces the disturbance and overcoupling. Therefore, smaller signal amplitudes can be used (e.g. +/- 5V).
The maximal data transfer rate is 115 kBd.

RS-422
This standard is used for the communication between a sender an a receiver. Four wires are needed, two send wires and two receive wires which are used alternately. On these wires a logical ‘1’ is represented by 5V on the upper wire (TX+ or RX+) and 0V on the lower wire (TX- or RX-),a logical ‘0' the other way round.

RS-485
The wires on this interface are used in push-pull operations like on the RS-422; however, only two wires are needed which are used in half-duplex mode.
Besides, the RS-485 supports the use of more than one sender or receiver by the use of a protocol. RS-485 supports cable lengths of up to 1.2 km and data transfer rates of up to 1 MBit/s (depending on the serial controller)
Data source, data sink
A data source or data sink is a data end unit, e.g. a PC, which sends and receives data. The data is is always sent from the source to the sink.

Full duplex
Possibility of simultaneous sending and receiving.

Half duplex
Alternating send and receive possibilty on one conduction (multiplexed).

Simplex
Only sending or receiving.

Push-pull operation
In push-pull-operation, one wire carries the signal which has to be transmitted, the second one the inverted signal (symmetrical conduction). On the end of the line, the difference of the two signal amplitudes is calculated. That way, common-mode interferences like crosstalk and noise have near to no effect on the transmission.